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Isaac Watts Quotes


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       Isaac Watts
       1674-1748
      
       Isaac Watts is recognised as the "Father of English Hymnody", as he was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. Many of his hymns remain in active use today and have been translated into many languages.
      
       His education led him to the pastorate of a large Independent Chapel in London, and he also found himself in the position of helping trainee preachers, despite poor health. Taking work as a private tutor, he lived with the non-conformist Hartopp family at Fleetwood House, Abney Park in Stoke Newington, and later in the household of Sir Thomas Abney and Lady Mary Abney at Theobalds, Cheshunt, in Hertfordshire, and at their second residence, Abney House, Stoke Newington.
      
       Though a non-conformist, Sir Thomas practised occasional conformity to the Church of England as necessitated by his being Lord Mayor of London 1700-01. Likewise, Isaac Watts held religious opinions that were more non-denominational or ecumenical than was at that time common for a non-conformist, having a greater interest in promoting education and scholarship, than preaching for any particular ministry.


    Isaac Watts on:    

To be angry about trifles is mean and childish; to rage and be furious is brutish; and to maintain perpetual wrath is akin to the practice and temper of devils; but to prevent and suppress rising resentment is wise and glorious, is manly and divine.

    Topics: Anger

The very substance which last week was grazing in the field, waving in the milk pail, or growing in the garden, is now become part of the man.

    Topics: Animals

A hermit who has been shut up in his cell in a college has contracted a sort of mould and rust upon his soul.

    Topics: Apathy

Some persons believe everything that their kindred, their parents, and their tutors believe. The veneration and the love which they have for their ancestors incline them to swallow down all their opinions at once, without examining what truth or falsehood there is in them. Men take their principles by inheritance, and defend them as they would their estates, because they are born heirs to them.

    Topics: Apathy, Truth, Parents

As a man may be eating all day, and for want of digestion is never nourished, so these endless readers may cram themselves in vain with intellectual food.

    Topics: Books

If a book has no index or good table of contents, it is very useful to make one as you are reading it.

    Topics: Books

Talking over the things which you have read with your companions fixes them on the mind.

    Topics: Books, Reading

In common discourse we denominate persons and things according to the major part of their character; he is to be called a wise man who has but few follies.

    Topics: Character, Wisdom

Satirists do expose their own ill nature.

    Topics: Character

Learn good-humor, never to oppose without just reason; abate some degree of pride and moroseness.

    Topics: Cheerfulness

When two or three sciences are pursued at the same time if one of them be dry, as logic, let another be more entertaining, to secure the mind from weariness.

    Topics: Cheerfulness

The child taught to believe any occurrence a good or evil omen, or any day of the week lucky, hath a wide inroad made upon the soundness of his understanding.

    Topics: Children, Education

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