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Politics Quotes


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Democracy means government by the uneducated, while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.

    Author: G.K. Chesterton

Half a truth is better than no politics.

    Author: G.K. Chesterton

I've searched all the parks in all the cities and found no statues of committees.

    Author: G.K. Chesterton

You can never have a revolution in order to establish a democracy. You must have a democracy in order to have a revolution.

    Author: G.K. Chesterton

The true genius that conducts a state is he, who doing nothing himself, causes everything to be done; he contrives, he invents, he foresees the future; he reflects on what is past; he distributes and proportions things; he makes early preparations; he incessantly arms himself to struggle against fortune, as a swimmer against a rapid stream of water; he is attentive night and day, that he may leave nothing to chance.

    Author: Francois Fenelon

It is not in the nature of politics that the best men should be elected. The best men do not want to govern their fellowmen.

    Author: George Macdonald

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.

    Author: George Washington

The constitution vests the power of declaring war in Congress; therefore no offensive expedition of importance can be undertaken until after they shall have deliberated upon the subject and authorized such a measure.

    Author: George Washington

There can be no greater error than to expect, or calculate, upon real favors from nation to nation. It is an illusion which experience must cure, which a just pride ought to discard.

    Author: George Washington

I beg leave to assure the Congress that no pecuniary consideration could have tempted me to accept this arduous employment at the expense of my domestic ease and happiness. I do not wish to make any profit from it.

    Author: George Washington

If we mean to support the liberty and independence which have cost us so much blood and treasure to establish, we must drive far away the demon of party spirit and local reproach.

    Author: George Washington

There is an opinion that parties in free countries are useful checks upon the administration of the government, and serve to keep alive the spirit of liberty. This, within certain limits, is probably true. But in governments of a popular character, and purely elective, it is a spirit not to be encouraged. From their natural tendency, there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary purpose. And there being constant danger of excess, the effort ought to be, by force of public opinion, to mitigate and assuage it. A fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent it bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.

    Author: George Washington

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